Sunday, May 26, 2013

Famous Selective Service registrations - לכבוד מעמאריאל דעי
















Rabbi Avraham Kalmanowitz





















Rabbi Shraga Feivel Mendlowitz
















The Lubavitcher Rebbe

















Harav Reb Moshe Feinstein


















R' Jacob Joseph Herman



















Rabbi Judah Levenberg of New Haven

25 comments:

Giyus said...

Rav Tzig, the WWII Draft cards also have a 2nd side to them. Assuming you found them on A******y.com, you can click the right arrow to go the the next "page". The 2nd side has other info, such as height, weight and facial features. With Rabbinic figures they usually wrote "bearded" or sometimes "heavily bearded"...

Anonymous said...

Paul mendelowitz?

Hirshel Tzig - הירשל ציג said...

Paul=Pavel=Faivel

very simple

Mimushnik said...

Hirshel, can you give some more info please? for what purpose was the registration? ecc. יש"כ

Hirshel Tzig - הירשל ציג said...

SELECTIVE SERVICE. The draft, בלע"ז

nostalgia said...

Beautiful.

itchiemayer said...

Perhaps Reb Moshe made a mistake on his registration? He was born in 1891...I think.

Giyus said...

Ah, good point folks. This draft was known as the "old man's draft".“The Old Man’s Draft”

After the United States entered World War II, a new Selective Service Act required that all men between the ages of 18 and 64 register for the draft. The Fourth Registration, or Old Man’s Registration, was held on April 27, 1942. The purpose of this registration was to collect information on the industrial capacity and skills of men who were born between April 27, 1877 and February 16, 1897 (ages 45 to 64). It was not intended that these men be drafted into military service but to determine if their labor skills could be used in the war effort. The registration would provide a complete inventory of manpower resources in the United States. The men had to fill out an extensive questionnaire, but unfortunately, the questionnaires have not survived.

Many of the registration cards have survived, however. Each record has 2 pages. The first page has the individual’s name, birth date, birth place, contact name etc. The second page is similar to the WWI draft registration, with physical description: race, height, weight, hair color, eye color, complexion, and identifying characteristics such as scars or burn marks. This information can provide a mental picture even if photographs of the individual don’t exist.

efraim said...

wasn't the rebbe born on April 5, 1902?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

EFRAIM said...

giyus: what's the adress

also someone else though what i thought, even though i HATE to agree with this person and HATE EVEN more to link to his site

link DELETED

efraim said...

but i do think he was dodging. the Rebbe was born in april 5, here's what wikipedia says about this The accepted date is April 5, 1902 OS. However, government documents, including his Russian passport, his application for French citizenship, his application for a U.S. visa, and his U.S. World War Two draft registration all indicate he was born in March 1895.

Hirshel Tzig - הירשל ציג said...

dodging? you think they wouldn't taken a 40 year old Russian refugee to the army?

Anonymous said...

B'emes, I don't think that after careful consideration they would take the Rebbe, however at first glance I think they would consider drafting him. If you look at the pictures from the early years, he does seem very able, and I would not call him a poor, down-trodden refugee, he lived in France and Germany, went to college, and had pretty decent living arrangements in America. Also, he didn't immigrate from Russia.

Anonymous said...

He had to write the same date of birth as his passport, what does that have to do with dodging?
(Also, since when did dodging become a negative thing, say that in the streets of bnei brak and you'll get lynched)

Anonymous said...

the 1895 date was used to avoid russian army draft.
it was on his immigration papers and passport so he continued using it.

efraim said...

Just by the way, I forgot to write my name the first anon was me...

Yes that does make sense, that he had to write the same date of birth as his passport and other documents.

Giyus said...

ancestry.com is the address.

moshe said...

they also have a card for r. aharon kotler and r. chaim heller...

Anonymous said...

Interesting that the focus in the comments is on the Lubavitcher Rebbe's birthdate. But if you look at Rabbi Moshe Feinstein's Selective Service card, you will see that his birthdate is recorded as March 8, 1881, when in fact he was born on March 3, 1895 (7 Adar, 5655) (a nearly 14-year differential).

Hirshel Tzig - הירשל ציג said...

well said, anonymous.

moshe moshel said...

Whi didn't you put the rebbes card first, derech eretz?

Hirshel Tzig - הירשל ציג said...

משום טעם כמוס

An Ailemesher said...

Who was the Lubavitcher Rebbe's employer? I can't read the handwriting.

Giyus said...

An Ailemesher, it reads "unemployed".

Leib said...

didn't the Lubavitcher Rebbe end up working for the navy in the brooklyn navy yard?