Friday, October 27, 2006

Learning out loud on the train -----



----- In English. Personally I think it's rude and unnerving, even for me, imagine what the Goy thinks!

You have such an urge to learn out loud? Bite your tongue. Can't control yourself? Tough.

There are these 2 Russian BT's who learn out loud with 2 big Gemorohs in hand, they too annoy the living daylights out of me, but at least they learn in their native tongue. We'll leave their mannerism out of this discussion for now. But to learn in English, better yet in Yeshinglish? You've got to stop. It's embarrassing for the rest of the tribe.

12 comments:

RMMS said...

There is not the vaguest shadow of doubt that, wherever our feet tread, it is all in order to cleanse and purify the world with words of Torah and tefilla (prayer). We, all of Israel, are emissaries of G-d, each of us as Divine Providence has decreed for us. None of us is free from this sacred task placed on our shoulders.

explaining the concept of purifying the air [by refining its spiritual content] through the recitation of the words of the Torah, in particular mishnayos, wherever it is permitted to do so according to Torah law, It is possible to bring a proof that purifying the air is relevant to [the Divine service] of working people. For the concept of air in Divine service and with regard to a person's soul is explained in several sources in Chassidus, including the maamar entitled Ner Chanukah in Torah Or. There it states that [air] can be described by an analogy to letters which are considered as inanimate objects when compared to the intellect, and it also can be described with the analogy of mitzvos when compared to the Torah.
It is clear that foul air,[3] i.e., letters which are comparable to inanimate objects, refer to deeds stemming from the side of evil.

The air must be purified through the incense offering which removes a foul odor, as stated in the maamar entitled Seir Izim, 5664.[4] This refers to mitzvos performed in actual deed, which[5] refers to the Divine service of working people. In particular, it can be explained that this refers to [these people's] speaking the letters of the Torah. For this encompasses two advantages, Torah study and the observance of the mitzvos. The observance of the mitzvos alone, in contrast, requires protection, as explained in the maamarim entitled VeZos HaMitzvah and Acharei Havayah in Likkutei Torah. See also the maamar entitled Limaan Tirah which explains our Sages' statement[6] that the term shmor, "protect," refers to the Mishnah, stating that this aspect of Torah is the breath that speaks words of Mishnah.... And [man's] breath evokes [G-d's] breath, as it were.

It is possible to explain that the purification of the air is merely a preparatory step to the ultimate Redemption. (As is well known, the exiles will not be gathered in except through the merit of the Mishnayos.[7] At this stage, however, there will be a limited number [of the Jewish people]. In the generation of Mashiach and in the World to Come there will be no limit, as explained at length in the maamar entitled ViEleh Shmos from the Mitteler Rebbe.

Antagonist said...

You're not happy enough that Lubavitchers are learning Nigleh?

tzibaleh said...

rmms, that does not mean that one has to create a scene, it could be done with dignity.

BTW i'm not responding to rmms but to the one who speaks in his name.

asdf said...

And what about the women who shuckel away???

תזיבאלהח said...

imho, they should reduce the shukel to 1/2 each way.
again, we have to be careful to make the best impression possible.
does anybody know some הלכות קידוש ה?

tzibaleh said...

oops that's tzibaleh

Hirshel Tzig said...

Women is another story.

tzibaleh said...

tzig, please elaborate.

Anonymous said...

To the genius who talks about being Methaher the Avir:

Loud recitation of Mishnayos etc. on a crowded subway car is not the intent here.

asdf said...

Tzig - are you saying that women are allowed to make public religious displays on the subway and men cannot?

Hirshel Tzig said...

I'm no Rav, I don't know. But I would think that people are more likely to respect women who quietly stand and pray, swaying or not, than loud, obnoxious men speaking in a concoction of many Languages in a crowded train.

Anonymous said...

I don't have an opinion on the Chavrusah learning, maybe they should at least keep the volume low enough, so as not to disturb others.

I read somewhere that in a yechidus the Rebbe told someone that when he learns on the train he need not vocalize, as the other passengers may think he is 'talking to himself'.